Alicia's Law

What is Alicia's Law?

Alicia Kozakiewicz works alongside PROTECT to secure the passage of her namesake, Alicia's Law, in all 50 states. Due to a lack of dedicated federal resources, less than two percent of known child exploitation cases are being investigated. Alicia's Law provides a dedicated steady stream of state-specific funding to the Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Forces. 

 

By creating a new revenue stream, Alicia's Law builds permanent capacity for child rescue teams, revenue that will not fall victim to yearly fights over or cuts to the general budget. Alicia's Law focuses on securing state funding for the Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) task forces, a network of 61 task forces that makes up the backbone of U.S. capacity to fight child exploitation.

 

The success and impact of Alicia's Law are measured solely in arrests and child rescues, and no funding is earmarked for nonprofit organizations or other related purposes.

 South 

 Carolina 

In Progress

Will provide for a 6.1% assessment on criminal court fines to be deposited in a newly-created Internet Crimes Against Children Fund that is to be used to investigate, prosecute, and prevent Internet crimes against children.

 Maryland 

2016​

Establishing the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Fund to provide grants to local law enforcement agencies for salaries, training, and equipment to be used for the investigation and prosecution of Internet crimes against children, to support a specified task force and for grants to specified child advocacy centers

 Arizona 

2015

Alicia's Law directs $5 million of leftover state lottery funds to locate and prosecute people participating in the sexual exploitation of children. The bill was sponsored by Arizona Representative Paul Boyer.

 Texas 

2011

Alicia's Law uses unclaimed lottery prize money to fund child exploitation investigations and will allocate up to $2 million every two years to Washington’s branch of Internet Crimes Against Children. Additionally, there will be $1,000 fine per image or video containing child pornography.

 California 

2007

California became the first state to provide funding to its Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) task force, after PROTECT campaigned for the funding. This early campaign led directly to the design of our Alicia's Law campaign. The campaign was led by Senator Jim Battin. During a severe budget crisis, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger added $1 million in state funds to his budget, after PROTECT warrior and actor David Keith made a strong, personal appeal.

 Ohio 

2019

$1 million added in the state budget for law enforcement teams that fight child exploitation and trafficking has been secured. The legislation, Alicia's Law was championed by Sen. Tim Schaffer (R) and Rep. Kent Smith (D). It will double the federal dollars received annually by the Ohio Internet Crimes Against Children task force.

 Kentucky 

2015

Alicia's Law increases money flowing into the Kentucky State Police's Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force. The additional money will come from a $10 court fee on all felonies and misdemeanors.

 Idaho 

2013

Alicia's Law passed in Idaho giving $2 million to the Idaho ICAC for stopping child exploitation and rescuing children, with $1.6 million in ongoing funding.

 Virginia 

2008

Virginia is the original home of Alicia's Law and the state where the legislation–expanded in multiple legislative sessions–is most advanced. Our Alicia's Law-Virginia has greatly expanded law enforcement resources in Virginia, resulting in the rescue of hundreds of children.  Alicia's Law secures funding and expansion of ICAC task forces across Virginia, resulting in expanded attack on child pornography and ensuring many new child rescues. Alicia's Law also created new fines on felonies and misdemeanors to create a permanent, dedicated revenue source for ICAC task forces.

 Wisconsin 

2016

We partnered with the Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel and Chairs Assemblyman Joel Kleefisch and Senator Van Wanggaard to secure resources to combat child exploitation and build boots on the ground for Wisconsin's Internet Crimes Against Children task force, in addition to securing admin subpoena power to expedite the rescue of Wisconsin children. It has been reported that since the passage of Alicia's Law in Wisconsin,1,000 online predators were arrested. Additionally, Alicia's Law funds added an electronic-sniffing K-9 Officer to the law enforcement team.The dog is named "Kozak."

 Washington 

2015

Alicia's Law uses unclaimed lottery prize money to fund child exploitation investigations and will allocate up to $2 million every two years to Washington’s branch of Internet Crimes Against Children. Additionally, there will be $1,000 fine per image or video containing child pornography.

 Hawaii 

2013

Alicia's Law establishes an Internet Crimes Against Children Fee for each felony or misdemeanor conviction, specifies order of priority for collection of fees, and creates an Internet Crimes Against Children Special Fund. 

 Tennessee 

2008

Tennessee became the second state to appropriate funding to its Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) task force. A budget amendment inserted by Governor Phil Bredesen doubled funding to the ICAC task force, resulting in the creation of a new affiliate hub in Memphis.

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